February 18 ~ Pastor Andrew

February 18 ~ Pastor Andrew

Free From the Law Galatians 3:15-22     http://cbcilderton.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Sermon-Feb-18-2018.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android |...

Good Tools Used Badly ~ Pastor Andrew

Sometimes what seemed like a good idea is shown to be a terribly bad plan.  When I lived in the States, winter frost was not a common occurrence. After one terribly bad storm, freezing rain had blanketed the area and had left car windshields thick and coated. A neighbor from a warmer climate needed to hurry off to work. When pouring boiling water on the windshield hadn’t melted the ice fast enough, they brought out a hammer and chisel. Needless to say, the ice chipping didn’t end so well. Hammers and chisels are excellent woodworking tools but horrendous for clearing ice off of glass. When lacking the proper resources or wanting to hurry to finish something, the temptation is to take a short cut. The law of God has an excellent purpose if it is used properly (1 Tim. 1:8). It can show you the true nature of your heart. It can point out the wrongs that you do. It can even suggest to you how to keep from evil and danger (Gal. 3:19-22). If you expect the law to give you a heart for God, you’re asking it to do something it was never designed to do – much like using a hammer and chisel to remove ice from a windshield. For some strange reason, humanity is prone to use good things in the wrong way. Medications can alleviate pain and suffering but aren’t supposed to be a coping strategy for emotional hurt. Physical fitness can keep you fit and alert but shouldn’t distract from other priorities in life. A car can get you where you need to...
February 11 ~ Pastor Andrew

February 11 ~ Pastor Andrew

Free From the Curse Galatians 3:10-14    http://cbcilderton.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Sermon-February-11-2018.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android |...

Everyday Justification Applied ~ Pastor Andrew

After the Challenger Space Shuttle tragedy in 1986, an investigation had been launched.  Why did the shuttle erupt after 75 seconds in flight? It was discovered that faulty rubber seals in the joints of the booster engine sections could not withstand the conditions required for space flight. The New York Times pointed to a deeper problem: a group of managers did not listen to the warnings and criticisms of those down the line who raised concerns about the operational reliability of these parts when under extreme stress. Receiving any critical feedback can be hard.  No one loves correction from their employer (or fellow employee), parent, spouse, child, or friend.  Who doesn’t prefer commendation over correction? When criticized or corrected, the human tendency is to justify oneself.  We see our situation more clearly (or so we tell ourselves) than the other person. We can rationalize or excuse our behavior or response.  We may not give full credence to the concern and dismiss it. What would happen if we became enamored with justification by faith alone? How might it impact our relationships? What would happen if this truth mastered our souls and it was not merely applied to our vertical relationship (with God) but also to our horizontal relationships (with others)? I can begin by hearing criticism, no matter how skewed, and remember that the biggest criticism of the universe has been removed from me (Rom. 8:1).  Because I am crucified with Christ and I no longer live but Christ lives in me (Gal. 2:20), I know I am far worse than the worst criticism.  God knows every wrong I’ve done...