Raised for Your Justification ~ Pastor Andrew

Around this time of year, mainstream news sources roll out questions about the validity of the resurrection. As sure as the ground hog shows up on February 2nd, questions about the resurrection arise before Good Friday and Resurrection Sunday. What shakes me isn’t the mainstream media’s portrayal of Christ – it’s predictable and expected. What shocks me is the Bible’s portrayal of the people within the Bible. When I’m least expecting it, along comes some startling revelation. Consider Abraham, the father of the faith and the example of trust in God. Romans 4:18-21 describes Abraham as believing without wavering, a man who did not weaken in faith, fully convinced that God was able to do what he had promised. But when I read Genesis, I read about a man who believes and doubts. After God promises Abraham many descendants and he believes, Abraham questions God about promised real estate: “How am I to know that I shall possess it?” (Gen. 15:5-8). Similarly, God promises that Sarah will have a son, but Abraham pleads, “Oh that Ishmael might be acceptable before you!” (Gen. 17:18, CSB). The Bible is brutally honest about the imperfect faith and the flaws of God’s people. There is only one hero in the Bible, and Abraham isn’t it. The hero is the Lord Jesus Christ, who takes imperfect faith and perfects it (Heb. 10:14). He takes not only our sin, but our imperfect record upon himself, and by dying bears the blame. But in being raised to life, God affirms the perfect work of his righteous Son and extends the benefits of Christ’s work to those...
March 28 ~ Pastor Andrew

March 28 ~ Pastor Andrew

Free From the Old Covenant Galatians 4:21-5:1    http://cbcilderton.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Audio-March-25-2018.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android |...

Whose your mama? ~ Pastor Gary

What does freedom mean to you? Commonly today we see freedom in political, financial, and personal terms: the right to vote as per one’s conscience, the ability to do as one pleases without hindrance, the liberty to think and act as one sees fit in themselves. One definition says: “Freedom is the power to act, speak, or think without hindrance or restraint.” It isn’t necessarily a bad one, but begs one massive question – from where does such power come? Freedom is one of the fundamental concepts of Western society, but as the West moves further from its Christian foundations freedom is rooted more and more in personal autonomy. Not that this is new for humans, for from our forebearers in the Garden to every generation since, our natural tendency is to root freedom in ourselves and outside of God’s gracious, loving rule. Evidently, we are slow learners! Generation after generation, when we are honest with ourselves, recognize that just like Paul we ‘do not do what we want to do, but do the very thing we don’t want to do (paraphrase from Romans 7:15)’. And yet the human response is to retreat further and further inward toward personal autonomy as our only answer to personal bondage. How do you identify with Paul? Are there ways of thought or habits of action that reflect bondage to law and sin rather than freedom in Christ? Paul warns us that this is a continual battleground for the Christian. “For freedom Christ has set you free; stand firm therefore, and do not submit again to a yoke of slavery. (Galatians 5:1)” As...